Bird Families

Crested Forest Quail / Odontophorus guttatus

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Toothed partridge (Odontophoridae (Gould, 1844)), or tree chickens , - a family of birds from the order of chickens (Galliformes), which are found in America, replace the partridges of the Old World in the New World.

The jagged partridge owes its name to its strong and denticulate beak. Representatives of the family are medium-sized or small motley-colored birds, quite reminiscent of the shape of their body partridges, and in their way of life occupying a middle place between them and grouse.

Appearance

In tree chickens, the nostrils are covered with bare scales, and the metatarsus are covered with shields. In contrast to the partridge, the mandibles of tree chickens are equipped with two teeth on each side. In size, jagged partridges are larger than partridges in the Old World, and their plumage is painted in brighter colors.

Spread

Toothed partridges are found exclusively in the New World. Their range stretches from Canada to northeastern Argentina. Of the 31 species of the family, only six are common on the North American continent.

Reproduction

They lead a monogamous lifestyle, and build their nests in dense thickets. One clutch contains, as a rule, from twelve to fifteen eggs.

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